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Trophic transfer of Everglades marsh consumer biomass to Everglades Estuaries (FCE), Everglades National Park, South Florida from December 2010 to Present


At a Glance


Authors: Jennifer Rehage
Time period: 2010-12-17 to 2013-07-01
Package id: knb-lter-fce.1199.2
Dataset id: LT_TDCS_Rehage_003

How to cite:
Rehage, J.. 2016. Trophic transfer of Everglades marsh consumer biomass to Everglades Estuaries (FCE), Everglades National Park, South Florida from December 2010 to Present. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/bb567fd4066fa2866419a1a200a89c92. Dataset accessed 2020-02-28.

Geographic Coverage


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Detailed Metadata


  • Dataset Abstract
    We measured the trophic transfer of secondary consumer biomass from the Everglades marshes to the oligohaline reaches of the Shark River by sampling the diets of four common large bodied piscivorous fishes occurring at the marsh-estuary oligohaline ecotone. The four species sampled were Florida bass (Micropterus floridanus), bowfin (Amia calva), common snook (Centropomus undecimalis), and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). We sampled diets via pulsed gastric lavage, a relatively non-lethal and effective sampling technique used to measure trophic interactions. We quantified trophic transfer of marsh biomass to the estuary when a focal piscivore consumed a prey species that was likely a migrant from adjacent marshes. A more detailed description of these methods can be found in citation #28. In the presented data, we combined estimates of relative abundance of piscivores from standardized electrofishing techniques (# of piscivores/ 100 meters of sampled shoreline) with biomass of marsh species consumed in the estuary to calculate the biomass (g) transferred to the estuary per 100 meters of shoreline. These values serve as our index of how much biomass is being exported off of the marsh to the estuary through consumer mediated habitat linkages. An important key finding from this work is that disturbance, in particular drought, can sever this biomass linkage, and conserve biomass export off of karstic wetlands to estuaries through of marsh secondary consumer trophic pathways.
  • Geographic Coverage
    Study Extent Description
    The Study Extent of this dataset includes areas near FCE Shark River Estuary, Everglades National Park, South Florida

    Bounding Coordinates
    Everglades marshes, South Florida
    N: 25.365, S: 25.365, E: -81.078, W: -81.078

    Florida Coastal Everglades LTER Study Area: South Florida, Everglades National Park, and Florida Bay
    N: 25.761, S: 24.913, E: -80.490, W: -81.078

    All Sites
    Geographic Description
    Bounding Coordinates
    Shark River Estuary, Everglades National Park, FL US.
    N: 25.761, S: 24.913, E: -80.490, W: -81.078
  • Attributes
    • Data Table:   Trophic transfer of Everglades marsh consumer biomass to Everglades Estuaries (FCE), Everglades National Park, South Florida
      Attribute Name:
      Date
      Attribute Label:
      Collection date
      Attribute Definition:
      sampling date
      Storage Type:
      datetime
      Measurement Scale:
      Missing Value Code:
       

      Attribute Name:
      Latitude_DD
      Attribute Label:
      Latitude_DD
      Attribute Definition:
      Latitude
      Storage Type:
      coordinate
      Measurement Scale:
      Latitude
      Missing Value Code:
      -9999.000 (Value will never be recorded )

      Attribute Name:
      Longitude_DD
      Attribute Label:
      Longitude_DD
      Attribute Definition:
      Longitude
      Storage Type:
      coordinate
      Measurement Scale:
      Longitude
      Missing Value Code:
      -9999.000 (Value will never be recorded )

      Attribute Name:
      BIOMASS_CONSUMED_PER_100_M
      Attribute Label:
      biomass
      Attribute Definition:
      Biomass of allochthonous marsh floodplain prey consumed by common piscivores found in the estuary
      Storage Type:
      data
      Measurement Scale:
      Units: gram
      Precision: 0.01
      Number Type: real
      Missing Value Code:
      -9999.000 (Value will never be recorded )


  • Methods
    Sampling Description
    We captured snook using a boat-mounted, generator-powered electrofisher (two-anode, one cathode Smith-Root 9.0 unit) . Boat electrofishing is an effective sampling technique in freshwater habitats, including the Everglades, and has been used successfully to sample upper estuarine fish communities. We conducted three replicate electrofishing bouts (timed sampling transects) at fixed locations in each site, each 200 m apart. For each bout, we ran the boat at idle speed at a randomly-selected creek shoreline and applied power for 5 min of time, during which two netters captured all immobilized fishes. We standardize power output to 1500 Watts, given temperature and conductance conditions measured at the beginning of each bout.

    Method Step

    Description
    We sampled diets via pulsed gastric lavage, a relatively non-lethal and effective sampling technique. We followed protocols found in IACUC Protocol #12-030.

    Citation
    Boucek, Ross E 2013-10-01. No free lunch: displaced marsh consumers regulate a prey subsidy to an estuarine consumer.. Oikos, 122(10): 1453-1464.

    Protocol

    Protocol Title:  Catching fish

    Protocol Creator(s)
    • Name: Ross  Boucek 
    • Position: Graduate Researcher
    • Organization: Florida International University
    • Address: Florida International University
      University Park
      ECS 119
      Miami, FL 33199 USA
    • Phone: 305-348-0181


    Publication Date:  2013-10-01

    Abstract
    We captured snook using a boat-mounted, generator-powered electrofisher (two-anode, one cathode Smith-Root 9.0 unit) . Boat electrofishing is an effective sampling technique in freshwater habitats, including the Everglades, and has been used successfully to sample upper estuarine fish communities (Rehage and Loftus 2007). We conducted three replicate electrofishing bouts (timed sampling transects) at fixed locations in each site, each 200 m apart. For each bout, we ran the boat at idle speed at a randomly-selected creek shoreline and applied power for 5 min of time, during which two netters captured all immobilized fishes. We standardize power output to 1500 Watts, given temperature and conductance conditions measured at the beginning of each bout.
    We captured snook using a boat-mounted, generator-powered electrofisher (two-anode, one cathode Smith-Root 9.0 unit) . Boat electrofishing is an effective sampling technique in freshwater habitats, including the Everglades, and has been used successfully to sample upper estuarine fish communities (Rehage and Loftus 2007). We conducted three replicate electrofishing bouts (timed sampling transects) at fixed locations in each site, each 200 m apart. For each bout, we ran the boat at idle speed at a randomly-selected creek shoreline and applied power for 5 min of time, during which two netters captured all immobilized fishes. We standardize power output to 1500 Watts, given temperature and conductance conditions measured at the beginning of each bout.
    We captured snook using a boat-mounted, generator-powered electrofisher (two-anode, one cathode Smith-Root 9.0 unit) . Boat electrofishing is an effective sampling technique in freshwater habitats, including the Everglades, and has been used successfully to sample upper estuarine fish communities (Rehage and Loftus 2007). We conducted three replicate electrofishing bouts (timed sampling transects) at fixed locations in each site, each 200 m apart. For each bout, we ran the boat at idle speed at a randomly-selected creek shoreline and applied power for 5 min of time, during which two netters captured all immobilized fishes. We standardize power output to 1500 Watts, given temperature and conductance conditions measured at the beginning of each bout.

    Keywords
    Electrofishing, fish capture
    Procedural Steps
    Apply electric current to sampling area
    net immobilized fish
    place fish into a water tank on boat

    Instrumentation
    The gastric lavage was built in the lab using a 50 Gallon per hour bilge pump andpressure fitted tubing. The nossel tubing of the lavage is 3/8 inch in diameter.

    Method Step

    Description
    We captured snook using a boat-mounted, generator-powered electrofisher (two-anode, one cathode Smith-Root 9.0 unit) . Boat electrofishing is an effective sampling technique in freshwater habitats, including the Everglades, and has been used successfully to sample upper estuarine fish communities. We conducted three replicate electrofishing bouts (timed sampling transects) at fixed locations in each site, each 200 m apart. For each bout, we ran the boat at idle speed at a randomly-selected creek shoreline and applied power for 5 min of time, during which two netters captured all immobilized fishes. We standardize power output to 1500 Watts, given temperature and conductance conditions measured at the beginning of each bout.

    Citation
    Young, Joy 2014-05-28. Spatiotemporal dynamics of spawning aggregations of common snook on the east coast of Florida.. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 505: 227-240.

    Instrumentation
    21' Aluminum boat fitted with a generator and other electrofishing equipment (see citation 28)

    Quality Control
    Employees, check entered data following standard QA/QC procedures.
  • Distribution and Intellectual Rights
    Online distribution
    http://fcelter.fiu.edu/perl/public_data_download.pl?datasetid=LT_TDCS_Rehage_003.txt
    Data Submission Date:  2014-11-17

    Intellectual Rights
    These data are classified as 'Type II' whereby original FCE LTER experimental data collected by individual FCE researchers to be released to restricted audiences according to terms specified by the owners of the data. Type II data are considered to be exceptional and should be rare in occurrence. The justification for exceptions must be well documented and approved by the lead PI and Site Data Manager. Some examples of Type II data restrictions may include: locations of rare or endangered species, data that are covered under prior licensing or copyright (e.g., SPOT satellite data), or covered by the Human Subjects Act, Student Dissertation data and those data related to the FCE LTER Program but not funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under LTER grants #DEB-9910514, and # DBI-0620409. Researchers that make use of Type II Data may be subject to additional restrictions to protect any applicable commercial or confidentiality interests. All publications based on this dataset must cite the data Contributor, the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program and that this material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation through the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research program under Cooperative Agreements #DEB-1237517, #DBI-0620409, and #DEB-9910514. Additionally, two copies of the manuscript must be submitted to the Florida Coastal Everglades LTER Program Office, LTER Program Manager, Florida International University, Southeast Environmental Research Center, OE 148, University Park, Miami, Florida 33199. For a complete description of the FCE LTER Data Access Policy and Data User Agreement, please go to FCE Data Management Policy at http://fcelter.fiu.edu/data/DataMgmt.pdf and LTER Network Data Access Policy at http://fcelter.fiu.edu/data/core/data_user_agreement/distribution_policy.html.

  • Keywords
    FCE, Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, ecological research, long-term monitoring, consumer dynamics, fishes, Rookery Branch , Electrofishing , Everglades National Park, catches, consumers, freshwater , estuarine, biology, species, Consumer mediated habitat linkages, Everglades estuary, consumers, biomass, trophic transfer, Everglades marsh consumer, secondary consumer biomass, biomass transfer
  • Dataset Contact
    • Position: Information Manager
    • Organization: LTER Network Office
    • Address: UNM Biology Department, MSC03-2020
      1 University of New Mexico
      Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 USA
    • Phone: 505 277-2535
    • Fax: 505 277-2541
    • Email: tech-support@lternet.edu
    • URL: http://www.lternet.edu

    • Name: Ross  Boucek 
    • Organization: Florida Coastal Everglades LTER Program
    • Address: Florida International University
      University Park
      ECS 119
      Miami, FL 33199 USA
    • Phone: 305-348-0181
    • Email: rbouc003@fiu.edu

    • Position: Information Manager
    • Organization: Florida Coastal Everglades LTER Program
    • Address: Florida International University
      University Park
      OE 148
      Miami, FL 33199 USA
    • Phone: 305-348-6054
    • Fax: 305-348-4096
    • Email: fcelter@fiu.edu
    • URL: http://fcelter.fiu.edu

  • Data Table and Format
    Data Table:  Trophic transfer of Everglades marsh consumer biomass to Everglades Estuaries (FCE), Everglades National Park, South Florida

    Entity Name:
    LT_TDCS_Rehage_003
    Entity Description:
    Trophic transfer of Everglades marsh consumer biomass to Everglades Estuaries (FCE), Everglades National Park, South Florida
    Object Name:
    LT_TDCS_Rehage_003
    Number of Header Lines:
    1
    Attribute Orientation:
    column
    Field Delimiter:
    ,