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Movements of aquatic mesopredators within the Shark River estuary (FCE LTER), Everglades National Park, South Florida, USA from February 2012 to Present


At a Glance


Authors: Jennifer Rehage
Time period: 2012-02-02 to 2021-08-27
Package id: knb-lter-fce.1198.5
Dataset id: LT_TDCS_Rehage_004

How to cite:
Rehage, J.. 2021. Movements of aquatic mesopredators within the Shark River estuary (FCE LTER), Everglades National Park, South Florida, USA from February 2012 to Present. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/8404e7eeccc4622c6175bfa8283639f8. Dataset accessed 2022-12-05.

Geographic Coverage


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Detailed Metadata


  • Dataset Abstract
    In South Florida, the allocation of the limited freshwater supply is of constant debate. Stakeholder groups for freshwater include agriculture, South Florida populations, and the natural environment and the ecosystem services that they provide. One ecosystem service invaluable to South Florida is the provisioning of coastal recreational fisheries. This ecosystem service generates approximately 8 billion dollars in angler expenditures in Florida alone. However, the interplay between the provisioning of fisheries and the allocation and input of freshwater to coastal systems is largely unknown. One such way that recreationally important fishes could be impacted by changes in freshwater inputs to coastal systems is through the availability of food. Previous research has shown that seasonal rainfall patterns and freshwater management create spikes in prey availability for important recreational fishes such as Common Snook (Centropomus undecimalis) and Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides). These prey pulses are restricted to the most inland reaches of the estuary. However, two important questions remain unanswered: 1) How far away do snook and bass move to take advantage of this prey subsidy? 2) Do these spikes in prey availability increase the reproductive output of snook? In order to answer these questions, we use acoustic telemetry to track the movements of key recreational fish species (Common Snook and Largemouth Bass) over multiple years (2012 – current) in the Shark River Estuary, Everglades National Park. Data provided by this study will be the first step in quantifying the importance of freshwater inflows to coastal fisheries. From a science perspective our research will provide valuable insight to how highly mobile species respond to pulses of prey across a patchy landscape, and how these temporary highly abundant resources will act to boost consumer populations. The value of pulsed resources to consumers have been identified as an important information gap in population ecology.
  • Geographic Coverage
    Study Extent Description
    Shark River Estuary, SFWSC Study Area

    Bounding Coordinates
    The Study Extent of this dataset includes areas near FCE Shark River Slough research sites (downstream of SRS 3) from Rookery Branch to Tarpon Bay within Everglades National Park, South Florida
    N: 25.463, S: 25.306, E: -80.863, W: -81.141

    FCE LTER Sites
    FCE

    All Sites
    Geographic Description
    Bounding Coordinates
    Shark River Estuary, Everglades National Park, FL US.
    N: 25.463, S: 25.306, E: -80.863, W: -81.141
  • Attributes
    • Data Table:   Movements of aquatic mesopredators within the Shark River estuary (FCE), Everglades National Park, South Florida from February 2012 to Present
      Attribute Name:
      Transmitter
      Attribute Label:
      Individual fish fitted with a transmitter
      Attribute Definition:
      The tag identification code of individual tags
      Storage Type:
      code
      Measurement Scale:
      The tag identification code of individual tags
      Missing Value Code:
       

      Attribute Name:
      Species
      Attribute Label:
      Species of tagged fish
      Attribute Definition:
      Common (and scientific) name of tagged fish
      Storage Type:
      text
      Measurement Scale:
      Common (and scientific) name of tagged fish
      Missing Value Code:
       

      Attribute Name:
      Datetime_UTC
      Attribute Label:
      Date and time of detection in UTC format
      Attribute Definition:
      Date and time of detection in UTC format
      Storage Type:
      datetime
      Measurement Scale:
      Missing Value Code:
       

      Attribute Name:
      Latitude
      Attribute Label:
      latitude in decimal degrees of a single detection
      Attribute Definition:
      coordinate
      Storage Type:
      coordinate
      Measurement Scale:
      coordinate
      Missing Value Code:
       

      Attribute Name:
      Longitude
      Attribute Label:
      Longitude in decimal degrees of a single detection
      Attribute Definition:
      coordinate
      Storage Type:
      coordinate
      Measurement Scale:
      coordinate
      Missing Value Code:
       


  • Methods
    Sampling Description
    Passive acoustic tracking was used to quantify the movement patterns of individual Common Snook and Largemouth Bass to assess their use of upstream areas of the estuary in response to the marsh prey pulse. Fish were surgically fitted with a Vemco V13 or V16 transmitter (Vemco, Halifax, NS, Canada). Transmitters were set to emit a unique series of pulses for each fish at a random interval between 60 and 180 s (mean emission interval = 120 s). Movements of acoustically tagged fish were tracked within an array of 43 Vemco VR2 and VR2W acoustic receivers. In situ measurements revealed mean detection ranges of receivers were c. 500 m. Each receiver was attached to a PVC pipe set in a 10-kg cement anchor. Data from receivers were downloaded every 3–4 months for the duration of the study, and batteries were replaced as needed.

    Method Step

    Description
    Fish were fitted with a V-13 or V-16 acoustic transmitters. Transmitters were implanted surgically into the body cavity of fishes following IACUC Protocol #201287. Transmitters emit an ultrasonic pulse at random every 60 – 180 seconds that can be interpreted by autonomous listening stations dispersed throughout the Shark River estuary. Once a listening station detects a transmitter, it records a time of detection and a unique tag ID. Data were downloaded off of receivers every two months

    Citation
    Matich, Philip 2014-01-01. Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary. Journal of Animal Ecology, 83(1): 199-213.

    Protocol

    Protocol Title:  Tagging fish

    Protocol Creator(s)
    • Name: Dr. Philip Matich  
    • Position: Graduate Student
    • Organization: Florida International University
    • Address: 3000 NE 151st
      North Miami, Florida  33181 USA
    • Email: pmati001@fiu.edu


    Publication Date:  2014-01-01

    Abstract
    Passive acoustic tracking was used to quantify the movement patterns of individual Common Snook and Largemouth Bass to assess their use of upstream areas of the estuary in response to the marsh prey pulse. Fish were surgically fitted with a Vemco V13 or V16 transmitter (Vemco, Halifax, NS, Canada). Transmitters were set to emit a unique series of pulses for each fish at a random interval between 60 and 180 s (mean emission interval = 120 s). Movements of acoustically tagged fish were tracked within an array of 43 Vemco VR2 and VR2W acoustic receivers. In situ measurements revealed mean detection ranges of receivers were c. 500 m. Each receiver was attached to a PVC pipe set in a 10-kg cement anchor. Data from receivers were downloaded every 3–4 months for the duration of the study, and batteries were replaced as needed.

    Keywords
    Acoustic tracking , Common Snook, Largemouth Bass, VEMCO
    Procedural Steps
    Immobilize fish with anesthetic
    create a 20 mm incision on ventral side of body cavity
    insert tag into body cavity
    close wound with 2 stiches
    waterproof wound with super glue

    Instrumentation
    V 13 transmitters are 13 x 36 mm in a cylinder shape, addtional information can be found https://www.innovasea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Innovasea-Fish-Tracking-69khz-tags-data-sheet-0621.pdf V 16 transmitters are 16 x 68 mm in a cylinder shape, addtional information can be found https://www.innovasea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Innovasea-Fish-Tracking-69khz-tags-data-sheet-0621.pdf VR2W Listening devices are cylindrical 308 mm long x 73 mm diameter and are anchored to the benthos additional information can be found https://www.innovasea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Innovasea-Fish-Tracking-vr2w_69khz-data-sheet-0621.pdf

    Method Step

    Description
    Fish were collected via electrofishing methods,

    Citation
    Boucek, Ross E 2013-10-01. No free lunch: displaced marsh consumers regulate a prey subsidy to an estuarine consumer.. Oikos, 122(10): 1453-1464.

    Protocol

    Protocol Title:  Catching fish

    Protocol Creator(s)
    • Name: Ross  Boucek 
    • Position: Graduate Researcher
    • Organization: Florida International University
    • Address: Florida International University
      University Park
      ECS 119
      Miami, FL 33199 USA
    • Phone: 305-348-0181


    Publication Date:  2013-10-01

    Abstract
    We captured Common Snook and Largemouth Bass using a boat-mounted, generator-powered electrofisher (two-anode, one cathode Smith-Root 9.0 unit) . Boat electrofishing is an effective sampling technique in freshwater habitats, including the Everglades, and has been used successfully to sample upper estuarine fish communities (Rehage and Loftus 2007). We conducted three replicate electrofishing bouts (timed sampling transects) at fixed locations in each site, each 200 m apart. For each bout, we ran the boat at idle speed at a randomly-selected creek shoreline and applied power for 5 min of time, during which two netters captured all immobilized fishes. We standardize power output to 1500 Watts, given temperature and conductance conditions measured at the beginning of each bout.

    Keywords
    Electrofishing, fish capture
    Procedural Steps
    Apply electric current to sampling area
    net immobilized fish
    place fish into a water tank on boat

    Instrumentation
    21 foot Aluminum boat fitted with a generator and other electrofishing equipment (see citation 28)

    Method Step

    Description
    Data Checking protocols

    Citation
    Young, Joy Spatiotemporal dynamics of spawning aggregations of common snook on the east coast of Florida.. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 505: 227-240.

    Protocol

    Protocol Title:  Checking data

    Protocol Creator(s)
    • Name: Joy  Young 
    • Position: Biological Scientist
    • Organization: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Tequesta Field Laboratory,
    • Address: 19100 Southeast Federal Highway
      Tequesta , Florida  33469 USA
    • Email: joy.young@myfwc.com


    Publication Date:  2014-05-01

    Abstract
    Telemetry data normally contain a certain amount of erroneous detections which can increase in number due to code collisions from the detection of other tags, and abiotic (e.g. boat) and biotic (e.g. snapping shrimp) noise. Prior to analyses, ‘false’ detections and were removed from the dataset.

    Keywords
    False detections , Data checking
    Procedural Steps
    identify distance and time between fish detections
    determine if that distance is feasible for fish to travel in the duration between detections
    If impossible, false detection is deleted

    Instrumentation
    None

    Quality Control
    Detection data are managed and checked through software provided by VEMCO. See http://vemco.com/products/vue-software/?product-software
  • Publications citing this dataset
    Massie, Jordan A., Rolando O. Santos, Ryan J. Rezek, W. Ryan James, Natasha M. Viadero, Ross E. Boucek, David A. Blewett, Alexis A. Trotter, Philip W. Stevens, and Jennifer S. Rehage. . Primed and cued: long-term acoustic telemetry links interannual and seasonal variations in freshwater flows to the spawning migrations of Common Snook in the Florida Everglades. Mov Ecol 10: 

    DOI: 10.1186/s40462-022-00350-5

  • Keywords
    populations, long-term monitoring, consumers, fishes, FCE, FCE LTER, Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, ecological research, consumer dynamics, Rookery Branch , snook movements, Everglades National Park, acoustic transmitters, consumers, freshwater , estuarine, biology, species, Centropomus undecimalis
  • Dataset Contact
    • Name: Jordan Massie 
    • Position: Jordan Massie
    • Organization: Institute of Environment, Southeast Environmental Research Center
    • Address: Florida International University
      University Park
      ECS 119
      Miami, FL 33199 USA
    • Phone: 305-348-0181
    • Email: jmass041@fiu.edu

    • Position: Information Manager
    • Organization: Florida Coastal Everglades LTER Program
    • Address: Florida International University
      University Park
      OE 148
      Miami, FL 33199 USA
    • Phone: 305-348-6054
    • Fax: 305-348-4096
    • Email: fcelter@fiu.edu
    • URL: http://fcelter.fiu.edu

  • Data Table and Format
    Data Table:  Movements of aquatic mesopredators within the Shark River estuary (FCE), Everglades National Park, South Florida from February 2012 to Present

    Entity Name:
    LT_TDCS_Rehage_004.csv
    Entity Description:
    Movements of aquatic mesopredators within the Shark River estuary (FCE), Everglades National Park, South Florida from February 2012 to Present
    Object Name:
    LT_TDCS_Rehage_004.csv
    Number of Header Lines:
    1
    Attribute Orientation:
    column
    Field Delimiter:
    ,
    Number of Records:
    5167429